Intern Presentation to Yale University Libraries

I gave this talk on August 15, 2008 at an event where the four Beinecke interns presented our accomplishments to staff, librarians, and administrators of the Yale University Libraries.

SLIDE ONE
First of all, I would like to say thank you to Rebekah, Aubrey, & Cliff in the Digital Projects Unit as well as Chris Edwards for so naturally balancing the ability to provide strong supportive guidance and to trust me to independently manage my projects.

And thanks to all of your who’ve been so generous to us, especially with your time. I found it informative and encouraging that so many people are so willing (and so excited) to talk about what they’re working on. And I’m pleased that so many of you cared to see what we’ve been up to this summer.

I’ve gotten to know the ins and outs of working in a fine digital library: the workflow, the every day challenges, the big picture issues.

SLIDE TWO: 1
Before I arrived, Nancy Kuhl & Rebekah Irwin identified the Viola Baxter Jordan collection as a priority for comprehensive digitization – that is, all of it. It’s small, about 3 boxes, and contains some great materials.

SLIDE TWO: 2
Nancy wanted item-level description, and this collection was to be one of the first to be

SLIDE TWO: 3
imaged with the new RIP cart, a faster imaging station with an SLR camera on a copystand that will produce jpegs sufficient for research in the DL.

SLIDE THREE
Who exactly was VBJ?
Well, she was a housewife in NJ
She really liked Gardening
She did NOT like modern poetry
But she happened to be childhood friends with HD, EP, Bill Williams

I first saw Viola as a parasitic hanger-on, a small town gossip who meticulously documented her peripheral brushings up against fame. But I came to see her as a deeply compassionate, intensely loyal person who sent parcel after parcel of food and hard-to-find goods to her estranged teenage friend in wartime London,

SLIDE FOUR
Hilda (that’s HD)

SLIDE FIVE
as well as her lover, Bryher, whom Viola never even met until after the war.

SLIDE SIX
Because of her loyalty she struggled as the EP she knew in NY and Philadelphia

SLIDE SEVEN
slapped a Mussolini quotation on his stationery and send her Fascist rants.

SLIDE EIGHT
But she was one of the only ppl to continue to communicate with him after his treason trial and once he was a patient at St Elizabeth’s psych hospital.

Her collection reveal much about her famous correspondents, but leaves us somewhat intrigued by Viola herself.

SLIDE NINE
This is our Inmagic DB that we use for cataloging items in the DL.
The descriptive metadata was very rich with full physical descriptions, LCSH subject access, subject access thru name authorities, & an abstract. 

SLIDE TEN
For things like postcards, greeting cards, etc. I did a bit of visual cataloging as well.

This level of cataloging was really an experiment & it became apparent that the deep cataloging that I was doing was too time-intensive.  I simply stopped doing the abstracts & I’m happy to say that by the time I leave, I will have completed all of VBJ’s correspondence.

SLIDE ELEVEN
We use Excel to create structural metadata.

SLIDE TWELVE: 1
If you want to know more, I will be posting on Nancy’s blog
SLIDE TWELVE: 2
Creating a subject guide
SLIDE TWELVE: 3
And after it goes through the RIP cart, you will see this collection in the Digital Images Online interface at the Beinecke website.

SLIDE THIRTEEN
Which looks like this

SLIDE FOURTEEN
So if that was learning the ropes, I spent an equal amount of my time this summer forging ahead, shall we say.  I had the unique charge of completing a Digital Environmental Scan  in which I spent a good amount of time evaluating the Beinecke’s current projects, comparing us to other institutions & their digital initiatives, and providing recommendations for the future.  My final report will be ready in just a few days, and I will be sure to make it available to anyone who is interested. Today, I will discuss only those suggestions which we began to implement. 

SLIDE FIFTEEN
We looked at 3 companies and selected on Guide by Cell to provide audio cell phone tours. These will add value to public visitor’s experience, can be listened to remotely, and require no infrastructure for us, as a traditional audio tour would.
We envision creating promotional materials like this to inform visitors about the tour. We have seen this tour work successfully at the Folger, Library of Congress, Getty, our Peabody museum, and hundreds others.

SLIDE SIXTEEN
Their online tool is easy to use
And they provide reports for us with useful statistics.

SLIDE SEVENTEEN
If you saw the email yesterday, you’ll know that we have one stop up, this is a proof-of-concept of a building tour. This summer we obtained two stops for items on permanent display:
SLIDE SEVENTEEN: 2
SLIDE SEVENTEEN: 3 (coming soon)

SLIDE EIGHTEEN
In the future, this technology can be used for
1: a full building tour, much like the SML with David McCullogh
2: for rotating exhibits, if the curators feel it will add to their work
3: other permanent display items

SLIDE NINETEEN
One of the great things about this is that we can reappropriate audio, as well. So we had Dr. Whobrey come in and discuss the Gutenberg bible. Well, he talked for much longer than the 2 minutes for the audio tour so we also created a more in-depth podcast about the bible, Gutenberg, and moveable type.

SLIDE TWENTY
Similarly, Wm. Reese will be featured for Birds of America. We are currently editing the conversation into a half-hour podcast, we’ll have a few minute audio tour stop, and we can begin to create a very dynamic presence.

SLIDE 21
We wanted to increase our overall netcast production, and I’m pleased to announce:
Molly & Nancy – Final edit just loaded.

SLIDE 22
Tim & Ellen – This was an experiment. We used the Digital Studio on 59 High to record. So we are seeing that it takes a lot of the work off of us, and potentially increases the quality of the recording, but we also lose some control. I cannot definitively say when we will have the audio file back from the studio to edit and then load.

SLIDE 23 How do I access these great netcasts?
1
2
3

SLIDE 24
I’m happy to announce that with Geoffrey Little at SML, we worked it out with Lucas Swineford and the office of digital content to add a Library section to Yale’s iTunes U page.

We’re the first and so far only group to be added after the initial roll out, and we got our own Beinecke tab.

SLIDE 25
So now we just need to make more!

SLIDE 26
Ideas for future Netcasts….

Katz, Robin M. “Digital Library Development Internship.” Beinecke intern presentations to Yale University Libraries professionals. New Haven, CT. August 15, 2008. Presentation.

ContactNeed a recommendation?
website design by Josh Shayne Design